Month: January 2013

Archive for January, 2013


Ascendas (India) Pvt. Ltd vs. DCIT (ITAT Chennai)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: January 12, 2013 (Date of publication)
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CITATION:

The assessee’s argument, with regard to the sale of shares in AITPL, that the TPO was bound by the CCI guidelines on valuation of shares is also not acceptable because the CCI guidelines were issued for a totally different purpose and cannot be transported into a pricing methodology prescribed for fixing ALP. Instead, the Discounted Cash Flow method for valuation is an accepted international methodology for valuing enterprises and for determining the value of the holding of an investor. Investors are interested in ascertaining the present value of their investments, considering the future earning potential of the underlying asset. Ascertaining the net present value of future earnings is more appropriate where market value of an investment is not readily ascertainable by conventional methods

CIT vs. Raunaq Education Foundation (Supreme Court)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: January 10, 2013 (Date of publication)
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Though the assessee trust issued a receipt in March 2002 when it received the cheque dated 22.4.2002, it was clearly stated in its record that the amount of donation was receivable in future and it was shown as donation receivable in the balance sheet as on 31.3.2002. Also Apollo Tyres Ltd did not avail any advantage of the said donation during the FY 2001-2002. When a post-dated cheque is issued, it will have to be presumed that the amount was paid on the date on which the cheque was given to the assessee and, therefore, it cannot be said that any undue favour was done by the assessee to Apollo Tyres Ltd. A cheque, unless dishonoured, is payment (Ogale Glass Works 25 ITR 529 (SC) followed)

GE India Industrial Pvt. Ltd vs. CIT(A) (ITAT Ahmedabad)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: January 8, 2013 (Date of publication)
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CITATION:

U/s 275(1)(a), the AO cannot pass an order imposing penalty u/s 271(1)(c) if the relevant assessment is subject matter of appeal before the CIT(A). The same analogy will apply where the CIT(A) initiates penalty and the first appeal is pending before the Tribunal. Accordingly, the assessee’s request that the penalty proceedings should be stayed till the disposal of appeal by the Tribunal is not unreasonable. If the CIT(A) is allowed to proceed with the penalty proceedings, prejudice will be caused to the assessee as it will have to face multiplicity of proceedings. In case the assessee succeeds in the quantum appeal, the penalty order passed by the CIT(A) will have no legs to stand while if the assessee fails in the quantum appeal, the CIT(A) will get ample time of six months to dispose of the penalty proceedings. Therefore, to prevent multiplicity of proceedings and harassment to the assessee, the CIT(A) is directed to keep the penalty proceedings in abeyance till the disposal of quantum appeal by the Tribunal (CIT vs. Wander (Bom) referred)

CIT vs. Orient Craft Ltd (Delhi High Court)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: January 6, 2013 (Date of publication)
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CITATION:

S. 147 permits an assessment to be reopened if there is “reason to believe“. It makes no distinction between an order u/s 143(3) or an Intimation u/s 143(1). Accordingly, it is not permissible to adopt different standards while interpreting the words “reason to believe” vis-à-vis s. 143(1) and s. 143(3). The department’s argument that the same rigorous standards which are applicable in the interpretation of the expression when it is applied to the reopening of a s. 143(3) assessment cannot apply to a s. 143(1) Intimation is not acceptable because it would place an assessee whose return is processed u/s 143(1) in a more vulnerable position than an assessee in whose case there is a full-fledged s. scrutiny assessment u/s 143(3). Whether the return is put to scrutiny or is accepted without demur is not a matter which is within the control of assessee. An interpretation which makes a distinction between the meaning and content of the expression “reason to believe” between a case where a s. 143(3) assessment is made and one where an Intimation u/s 143(1) is made may lead to unintended mischief, be discriminatory & lead to absurd results. In Kelvinator 320 ITR 561 (SC) it was held that the term “reason to believe” means that there is “tangible material” and not merely a “change of opinion” and this principle will apply even to s. 143(1) Intimations. On facts, the AO reached the belief that there was escapement of income “on going through the ROI” filed by the assessee. This is nothing but a review of the earlier proceedings and an abuse of power by the AO. There is no whisper in the reasons recorded of any tangible material which came to the possession of the AO subsequent to the issue of the Intimation. It reflects an arbitrary exercise of the power conferred u/s 147 (Rajesh Jhaveri Stock Brokers 291 ITR 500 (SC) distinguished)

CIT vs. Sania Mirza (Andhra Pradesh High Court)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: January 5, 2013 (Date of publication)
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CITATION:

There is nothing to suggest that the assessee acted in a manner such as to lead to the conclusion that she had concealed the particulars of her income or had furnished inaccurate particulars of income. As the amount of Rs.30,63,310 was shown by her in the return, it cannot be said that there was any concealment. As the amount was correctly mentioned, there is also nothing inaccurate in the particulars furnished by her. The only error that seems to have been committed was that it was not shown as a capital (sic) receipt. But as soon as this was pointed out, the error was accepted and the amount was surrendered to tax. This is not a fit case for imposition of penalty

Synopsys International Limited vs. DDIT (ITAT Bangalore)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: January 1, 2013 (Date of publication)
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CITATION:

In GKN Driveshafts 259 ITR 19 (SC) it was held that the AO is bound to furnish the reasons recorded for reopening the assessment within a reasonable time so that the assessee can file its objections thereto. Even as per the rules of natural justice, the assessee is entitled to know the basis on which the AO has formed an opinion that income has escaped assessment. There is no justifiable reason for the AO to deprive the assessee of the recorded reasons. If the reasons are not furnished to the assessee during the assessment proceedings, then the subsequent furnishing of the reasons after completion of assessment proceedings serves no purpose and amounts to the assessee being denied its right to raise objections to the validity of the reopening proceedings. A reassessment order passed without furnishing the recorded reasons is not sustainable in law. The furnishing of reasons after completion of assessment does not make good the defect/invalidity with which the initiation of proceedings u/s 147/148 is tainted (K V Venkataswamy Reddy (Bang) (attached), Tata International Ltd (ITAT Bom) & Videsh Sanchar Nigam Ltd 340 ITR 66 (Bom) (SLP dismissed) followed)

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