Month: July 2010

Archive for July, 2010


CERC vs. National Hydroelectric Power Corp (Supreme Court)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: July 29, 2010 (Date of publication)
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CITATION:

In addition to normal mode of service, service of Notice(s) may be effected by E-Mail for which the advocate(s) on-record will, at the time of filing of petition/appeal, furnish to the filing counter a soft copy of the entire petition/appeal in PDF format

Posted in All Judgements, Supreme Court

In Re The Timken Company (AAR)

COURT:
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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: July 29, 2010 (Date of publication)
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CITATION:

Though s. 2(17) defines a “company” to include a “foreign company”, the context of the definition has to be seen. Income, which does not have a source in India, cannot be made part of the book profits. The annual accounts, including the P&L Account, cannot be prepared as per s.115JB(2) in respect of the world income and laid before the company at its AGM in accordance with s. 210 of the Companies Act. The speech of the Finance Minister and the Memorandum explaining the provision also become out of sync if the meaning of “company” appearing in s. 115JB is adopted as ‘foreign company”. Any other meaning would take away force and life from the true intent of the makers of the Act. The contention of the department that there is no demarcation between a ‘domestic company’ and a ‘foreign company’ while applying s. 115JB is not acceptable. As the applicant did not have a place of business in India and was not required to prepare its accounts under s. 594 r.w.s. 591 of the Companies Act, it could not have prepared its accounts in accordance with the provisions of Part II and III of Schedule VI of the companies Act, 1956

Posted in AAR, All Judgements

Bapushaeb Nanasaheb Dhumal vs. ACIT (ITAT Mumbai)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: July 26, 2010 (Date of publication)
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CITATION:

Failure to deduct or deposit tax as per s. 194C or Chapter-XVII makes the assessee liable to the consequences provided under the said Chapter-XVII. However, s. 40(a)(ia) is in addition to Chapter XVII. S. 40(a)(ia)(A) provides that if tax is deducted during the last month of the previous year and paid on or before the due date of filing of return as per s. 139(1), then such sum shall be allowed as deduction. In cases where tax is deducted other than the last month of previous year but is deposited before the last day of the previous year, then it will be allowed as deduction. Therefore, the conditions for allowability of deduction are prescribed u/s 40(a)(ia) itself and Chapter-XVII and s. 194C are not relevant. If the condition of deduction and payment prescribed u/s 194C / Chapter XVII are held applicable for disallowance of deduction u/s 40(a)(ia), then s. 40(a)(ia) will be rendered meaningless, absurd and otiose. Since the assessee had (belatedly) deducted tax in the last month of the previous year i.e. March 2005 and deposited the same before the due date of filing the return u/s 139(1), deduction had to be allowed u/s 40(a)(ia) (A)

Posted in All Judgements, Tribunal

Garware Polyester vs. State (Bombay High Court)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: July 23, 2010 (Date of publication)
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CITATION:

The AO passed an assessment order in which he declined to follow the judgement of the Bombay High Court in CST vs. Pee Vee Textiles 26 VST 281 on the ground that the said judgement “is not accepted by the Sales Tax Department and legal proceeding is initiated against the said judgment”. On a Writ Petition filed by the assessee, the High Court has taken the view that as the said judgement in Pee Vee Textiles is not stayed, “the refusal to follow and implement the judgment of this Court by Mr.Dubey in our considered view prima facie amounts to contempt of this Court”. The Court directed issue of a show-cause notice to the AO as to why action under the Contempt of Courts Act should not be initiated against him

Posted in All Judgements, High Court

DCIT vs. Shreyas S. Morakhia (ITAT Mumbai Special Bench)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: July 22, 2010 (Date of publication)
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CITATION:

In Veerabhadra Rao 155 ITR 152 the Supreme Court held in the context of a loan that if the interest is offered to tax, the loan has been “taken into account in computing the income of the assessee” and qualifies for deduction u/s 36(1)(vii). The effect of the judgement is that in order to satisfy the condition stipulated in s. 36(2)(i), it is not necessary that the entire amount of debt has to be taken into account in computing the income of the assessee and it will be sufficient even if part of such debt is taken into account in computing the income of the assessee. This principle applies to a share broker. The amount receivable on account of brokerage is a part of debt receivable by the share broker from his client against purchase of shares and once such brokerage is credited to the P&L account and taken into account in computing his income, the condition stipulated in s. 36(2)(i) gets satisfied. Whether the gross amount is reflected in the credit side of the P&L A/c or only the net amount is finally reflected as profit after deducting the corresponding expenses or only the net amount of brokerage received by the share broker is reflected in the credit side of the P&L account makes no difference because the ultimate effect is the same

Posted in All Judgements, Tribunal

Linklaters LLP vs. ITO (ITAT Mumbai)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: July 17, 2010 (Date of publication)
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CITATION:

As regards the quantum of profits attributable to the PE, Article 7 (1) provides for the taxability of profits “directly or indirectly attributable” to the PE. The words “profits indirectly attributable to the PE” incorporates the “force of attraction” principle. To give effect to the “force of attraction” principle, in addition to taxability of income in respect of services rendered by the PE in India, any income in respect of the services rendered to an Indian project, which is similar to the services rendered by the PE is also to be taxed in India in the hands of the assessee – irrespective of whether such services are rendered through the PE or directly by the GE. There cannot be any professional services rendered in India which are not, at least indirectly, attributable to carrying out professional work in India. This indirect attribution is enough to bring the income from such services within ambit of taxability in India. The two conditions to be satisfied for taxability of related profits are (i) the services should be similar or relatable to the services rendered by the PE in India; and (ii) the services should be ‘directly or indirectly attributable to the Indian PE’ i.e. rendered to a project or client in India. The result is that the entire profits relating to services rendered by the assessee, whether in India or outside, in respect of Indian projects is taxable in India.

Posted in All Judgements, Tribunal

DDIT vs. SET Satellite (Singapore) (ITAT Mumbai)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: July 15, 2010 (Date of publication)
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CITATION:

Assuming the payment for obtaining cricket telecast rights is “royalty”, under the first limb of Article 12(7) of the DTAA, royalties can be said to have arisen in India only if the payer is a resident of India. This condition is not fulfilled as the assessee was a non-resident. Under the second limb of Article 12(7), payments made by a non-resident are deemed to arise in India if the non-resident has a PE in India with which the liability to pay the royalties is incurred and such royalties are borne by the PE. This condition is also not fulfilled because the mere existence of a PE in India does not mean that royalties arise in India. In addition to the existence of PE, it is essential that liability to pay such royalties has been “incurred in connection with” and is “borne by” the PE of the payer in India. There must be an “economic link” between the liability for payment of such royalties and PE. As there was no economic link between the payment of royalties and the PE of the assessee in India, the payments to GCC are not incurred “in connection” with the PE in India. Further, the PE was also not involved in any way with the acquisition of the right to broadcast the cricket matches, nor did the PE bear the cost of payments to GCC. Thus the payments to GCC were not “borne by” the PE in India

Posted in All Judgements, Tribunal

DCIT vs. M/s Starlite (ITAT Mumbai)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: July 15, 2010 (Date of publication)
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CITATION:

the TPO is wrong in adopting the enterprise level margins as the TNMM. U/s 92F (ii) r.w.s. 10B(e), TNMM requires comparison of net profit margins realized by an enterprise from an international transaction(s) and not comparison of operating margins of enterprises

Posted in All Judgements, Tribunal

CIT vs. Kalpataru Colours and Chemicals (Bombay High Court)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: July 10, 2010 (Date of publication)
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CITATION:

The argument that s. 28(iiid) covers only the “profit” (difference between sale consideration and face value of the DEPB credit) and that the “face value” is assessable u/s 28(iiib) is not correct. The entire amount received on transfer of the DEPB credit is “profits” and falls under s. 28(iiid). There was no basis or justification for the Tribunal to hold that the face value of the DEPB credit can be reduced from the sale consideration. It is not permissible to bifurcate the proceeds of the DEPB into “face value” and “excess of face value”. The approach of the Tribunal is misconceived and unsustainable. As the assessee had an export turnover exceeding Rs.10 crores and did not fulfill the conditions set out in the third proviso to s. 80HHC (3), it was not entitled to a deduction u/s 80HHC on the amount received on transfer of DEPB.

Posted in All Judgements, High Court

Rain Commodities vs. DCIT (ITAT Hyderabad Special Bench)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: July 9, 2010 (Date of publication)
AY:
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CITATION:

The assessee had included the said capital gains in the P & L A/c and it was not its’ case that same was not includible. The fact that the capital gains was exempt u/s 47(iv) does not mean it can be excluded from the “book profit” because no such exclusion was permitted under the Explanation to s. 115JB. The taxability of capital gain is relevant only for the purpose of computation of income under the normal provisions and has nothing to do with the computation of “book profits”.

Posted in All Judgements, Tribunal
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