Month: February 2012

Archive for February, 2012


D.K.Srivastava vs. UOI & Ors (Central Administrative Tribunal)

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DATE: February 29, 2012 (Date of publication)
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FILE: Click here to view full post with file download link
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The documentation indicates an unsavoury and uneasy situation prevalent at the Chandigarh Bench of the ITAT and the litigating parties are found to be engaged in an unenviable endeavour to wash the proverbial dirty linen in public. The prevalence of the factual scenario, indicating almost complete want of trust and faith inter-se, ought to be foreign to each segment of dispensation of justice which (system), for optimum and unbiased delivery requires an ambience based upon balanced and conscientious approach. For reasons of propriety, we are not noticing any part of the mutual acrimony as between the personnel who are a part of the dispensation at the local Bench of ITAT. We express our deep sense of exasperation at the prevalent scenario and hope and trust that the sentiments expressed by the President of the ITAT in the course of his letter dated 4.1.2012 for ensuring bonhomie at the local Bench of the ITAT, would be pursued to its logical conclusion

Posted in All Judgements, Tribunal

V.R.A. Cotton Mills (P) Ltd vs. UOI (P&H High Court)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: February 29, 2012 (Date of publication)
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FILE: Click here to view full post with file download link
CITATION:

S. 143(2) (ii) provides that no notice shall be “served” on the assessee after the expiry of six months. The question is that what is the meaning of expression ‘served’? Is it used literally, so as to mean actual physical receipt of notice by the addressee or the expression ‘served’ is inter changeable with the word issue. We are of the opinion that the expressions ‘serve’ and ‘issue’ are interchangeable. In view of the law laid down in several judgments, the date of receipt of notice by the addressee is not relevant to determine, as to whether the notice has been issued within the prescribed period of limitation. The expression “serve” means the date of issue of notice. The date of receipt of notice cannot be left to be undetermined dependent upon the will of the addressee. Therefore, to bring certainly and to avoid attempts of the addressee to evade the process of receipt of notice, the purpose of the statute will be better served, if the date of issue of notice is considered as compliance of the requirement of proviso to s. 143(2) of the Act. In fact that is the only conclusion that can be arrived at to the expression ‘serve” in s. 143(2). In AVI-OIL India 323 ITR 242 (P&H), a literal meaning of the term “service” was taken in ignorance of the binding precedents. It does not lay down any binding principle and is per incuriam

Posted in All Judgements, High Court

Sak Industries Pvt Ltd vs. DCIT (Delhi High Court)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: February 27, 2012 (Date of publication)
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Though, pursuant to GKN Driveshaft, the AO was under an obligation to dispose of the objections to the reopening by passing a speaking order, he passed a non-speaking and cryptic order. Further, though the AO had sufficient time to complete the assessment, he had proceeded with the reassessment proceedings with undesirable haste and hurry, in violation of principles of natural justice and contrary to the procedure mandated and this had resulted in a miscarriage of justice. The fact that the assessee had an alternative remedy of filing an appeal (which it had exercised) was no bar to the exercise of writ jurisdiction. The concerned CIT should examine the reassessment file in the present case and take appropriate action if warranted. The department to pay cost of Rs.10,000 to the assessee.

Posted in All Judgements, High Court

CIT vs. DSL DSoftware Ltd (Karnataka High Court)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: February 27, 2012 (Date of publication)
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FILE: Click here to view full post with file download link
CITATION:

This case shows how the department is filing appeals without proper application of mind and wasting the precious time of the Court and the tax payer’s money. Even if the AO was overzealous in passing the assessment order, there was no need to file an appeal to the High Court. This is not an isolated case. The department is filing appeals mechanically either for the purpose of statistics or to save their skins without application of mind. In the process, a person eligible to tax holiday has been denied the benefit and made to contest the proceedings. If the object of extending the benefits was to give added thrust to exports, the assessee is made to unnecessarily waste his time in fighting the dispute in different forums. The only way to bring reason to the department is by imposing costs so that appropriate action may be taken against the person who has taken a decision to file the appeal and recover the same after enquiry. The department is directed to pay costs of Rs. 1 lakh for wasting the tax payer’s money. lt is open to the authorities to recover the money from the person who has taken a decision to file the frivolous appeal

Posted in All Judgements, High Court

A.K. Balaji vs. GOI (Madras High Court)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: February 21, 2012 (Date of publication)
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CITATION:

Foreign law firms or foreign lawyers cannot practice the profession of law in India either on the litigation or non-litigation side, unless they fulfil the requirement of the Advocates Act, 1961 and the Bar Council of India Rules. As rightly held in Lawyers Collective vs. Bar Council 112 BLR 32 establishing liaison office in India by the foreign law firm and rendering liaisoning activities is not permissible. However, given that the foreign law firms have to give legal advise to their clients in India regarding foreign law or their own system of law and on diverse international legal issues, there can be no bar in their visiting India for a temporary period on a “fly in and fly out” basis, for such purpose. Also, having regard to the aim and object of the International Commercial Arbitration introduced in the Arbitration and Conciliation Act, 1996, foreign lawyers cannot be debarred to come to India and conduct arbitration proceedings in respect of disputes arising out of a contract relating to international commercial arbitration (Vodafone International Holdings B.V referred)

Posted in All Judgements, High Court

Catholic Syrian Bank Ltd vs. CIT (Supreme Court)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: February 20, 2012 (Date of publication)
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CITATION:

The clear legislative intent of s. 36(1)(vii) & 36(1)(viia) together with the circulars issued by the CBDT demonstrate that the deduction on account of provision for bad and doubtful debts u/s 36(1)(viia) is distinct and independent of s. 36(1)(vii) relating to allowance of bad debts. The legislative intent was to encourage rural advances and the making of provisions for bad debts in relation to such rural branches. The functioning of such banks is such that the rural branches were practically treated as a distinct business, though ultimately these advances would form part of the books of accounts of the head office. An interpretation which serves the legislative object and intent is to be preferred rather than one which subverts the same. The deduction u/s 36(1)(vii) cannot be negated by reading into it the limitations of s. 36(1)(viia) as it would frustrate the object of granting such deductions. The Revenue’s argument that this would lead to double deduction is not correct in view of the Proviso to s. 36(1)(vii) which provides that in respect of rural advances, the deduction on account of the actual write off of bad debts would be limited to excess of the amount written off over the amount of the provision which had already been allowed u/s 36(1) (viia) (Southern Technologies 320 ITR 577 (SC) & Vijaya Bank 323 ITR 166 (SC) referred)

Posted in All Judgements, Supreme Court

DCIT vs. Pioneer Marbles & Interiors Pvt Ltd (ITAT Kolkata)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: February 19, 2012 (Date of publication)
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CITATION:

S. 271 AAA makes a paradigm shift on the imposition of penalty in respect of unaccounted income unearthed as a result of search operation. Unlike s. 271(1)(c), s. 271 AAA penalty is imposable on undisclosed income without “concealment” or “furnishing inaccurate particulars” having to be shown. S. 271AAA(2) grants immunity from penalty if (i) in the s. 132(4) statement, the undisclosed income is admitted and the manner of deriving it is specified; (ii) the manner in which the undisclosed income was derived is substantiated; and (iii) the tax & interest on the undisclosed income is paid. While payment of taxes & interest is a condition precedent for availing immunity u/s 271AAA(2), there is no time limit for such payment. In the absence of a time limit for payment of tax & interest in the statute, the AO’s stand that it ought to have been paid at the time of filing the ROI is not acceptable. Further, though in the context of Explanation 5 to s. 271(1)(c) it has been held in Mahendra Shah 299 ITR 305 (Guj) that the conclusion of the assessment proceedings is the outer limit for making payment of tax & interest, that was in the context of s. 271(1)(c) which required the AO to record his satisfaction in the course of the assessment proceedings itself. As there is no such requirement in s. 271 AAA, there is no outer limit for payment of the due tax & interest. On facts, as the assessee had paid the due tax & interest within the time specified in the s. 156 notice of demand, s. 271AAA penalty was not imposable

Posted in All Judgements, Tribunal

Arun Shungloo Trust vs. CIT (Delhi High Court)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: February 17, 2012 (Date of publication)
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FILE: Click here to view full post with file download link
CITATION:

The department’s contention that in a case where s. 49 applies the holding of the predecessor has to be accounted for the purpose of computing the cost of acquisition, cost of improvement and indexed cost of improvement but not for the indexed cost of acquisition will result in absurdities. It leads to a disconnect and contradiction between “indexed cost of acquisition” and “indexed cost of improvement”. This cannot be the intention behind the enactment of s. 49 and the Explanation to s. 48. There is no reason why the legislature would want to deny or deprive an assessee the benefit of the previous holding for computing “indexed cost of acquisition” while allowing the said benefit for computing “indexed cost of improvement”. The benefit of indexed cost of inflation is given to ensure that the taxpayer pays capital gain tax on the “real” or actual “gain” and not on the increase in the capital value of the property due to inflation. The expression “held by the assessee” used in Explanation (iii) to s. 48 has to be understood in the context and harmoniously with other Sections and as the cost of acquisition stipulated in s. 49 means the cost for which the previous owner had acquired the property, the term “held by the assessee” should be interpreted to include the period during which the property was held by the previous owner. CIT v. Manjula J. Shah 16 Taxman 42 (Bom) followed

Posted in All Judgements, High Court

ACIT vs. Dr. B.V. Raju (ITAT Hyderabad Special Bench)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: February 16, 2012 (Date of publication)
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FILE: Click here to view full post with file download link
CITATION:

The taxability of a non-compete fee depends on the purpose for which it is paid. A non-compete fee can be divided into two categories: (a) consideration received by the transferor of a business for agreeing not to carry on the same business; (b) consideration received by other persons associated with the transferor to ensure that they do not indulge in competing business. For AY 2003-04 & onwards, non-compete fee received by the transferor of a business is taxable as a capital gains in view of s. 55(2)(a) which provides that the cost of a “right to carry on business” shall be Nil. Though s. 55(2)(a) as amended by the FA 1997 w.e.f. 1.4.1998 referred to a “right to manufacture, produce or process any article or thing“, that would not cover a non-compete covenant. For AY 2003-04 & onwards, a non-compete fee received by a person associated with the transferor is taxable as “business profits” u/s 28(va)(a) as being a payment for “not carrying out any activity in relation to any business“. A non-compete fee received in an earlier year is not chargeable to tax in view of Guffic Chem vs. CIT 320 ITR 602 (SC)

Posted in All Judgements, Tribunal

DDIT vs. M/s. Solid Works Corporation (ITAT Mumbai)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: February 14, 2012 (Date of publication)
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CITATION:

The department’s argument that Ericsson AB 204 TM 192 was confined to a case where the software was embedded to the equipment is not correct. The Court did hold that consideration paid merely for right to use cannot be held to be royalty and the ratio would also apply when “shrink wrap” software is sold. Where two views are possible, the view in favour of the assessee has to be preferred. This principle is applicable to non-resident assessees as well in view of Article 24(1) of the DTAA (non-discrimination) which provides that nationals of a Contracting State shall not be treated less favourably than the nationals of the other Contracting State

Posted in All Judgements, Tribunal
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