Search Results For: 143(1) assessment


Indu Lata Rangwala vs. DCIT (Delhi High Court)

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DATE: May 18, 2016 (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: May 21, 2016 (Date of publication)
AY: 1999-2000
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CITATION:
S. 143(1)/ 147: Entire law on the reopening of s. 143(1) assessments in the light of Zuari Estate Development 373 ITR 661 (SC) explained

Whereas in a case where the initial assessment order is under Section 143 (3), and it is sought to be reopened within four years from the expiry of the relevant assessment year, the AO has to base his ‘reasons to believe’ that income has escaped assessment on some fresh tangible material that provides the nexus or link to the formation of such belief. In a case where the initial return is processed under Section 143 (1) of the Act and intimation is sent to the Assessee, the reopening of such assessment no doubt requires the AO to form reasons to believe that income has escaped assessment, but such reasons do not require any fresh tangible material

DCIT vs. Zuari Estate Development & Investment Co Ltd (Supreme Court)

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DATE: April 17, 2015 (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: November 26, 2015 (Date of publication)
AY: 1991-92
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CITATION:
S. 143(1)/ 147: As a s. 143(1) intimation is not an assessment, there is no question of "change of opinion" by the AO

Can it be said that any “assessment” is done by them? The reply is an emphatic “no”. The intimation under Section 143(1)(a) was deemed to be a notice of demand under Section 156, for the apparent purpose of making machinery provisions relating to recovery of tax applicable. By such application only recovery indicated to be payable in the intimation became permissible. And nothing more can be inferred from the deeming provision. Therefore, there being no assessment under Section 143(1)(a), the question of change of opinion, as contended, does not arise

Varshaben Sanatbhai Patel vs. ITO (Gujarat High Court)

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DATE: October 13, 2015 (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: November 26, 2015 (Date of publication)
AY: 2009-10
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CITATION:
S. 143(1)/ 147: If the assessment is reopened on the ground of “bogus purchases”, the reasons must contain an averment of which details on record reflect the bogus purchases

The returns filed by the assessee have been processed under section 143(1) of the Act. The Assessing Officer in the reasons recorded for the purpose of reopening the assessment has placed reliance upon the record of the case. As noted hereinabove, there is no assertion as regards on what basis the Assessing Officer has stated that the assessee had made claim in respect of bogus purchases in the trading and the Profit and Loss Account as expenditure. The Assessing Officer has stated that on verification of the details available on record, it has been noticed that the assessee has made bogus purchases; however, no specific averments are made as regards which details available on record reflected such bogus purchases

ACIT vs. M/s Northern Tannery (ITAT Lucknow)

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DATE: September 18, 2014 (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: October 5, 2014 (Date of publication)
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CITATION:
Reopening of s. 143(1) assessment on the basis of the retrospective amendment of section 80HHC of the Act by the Taxation Law (Amendment) Act, 2005 is bad as the said amendment is struck doen in Avani Exports vs. CIT (Guj HC)

We find force in the contentions of the Revenue as the assessment order which was sought to be reopened by the Assessing Officer was only an intimation under section 143(1) of the Act and not a regular assessment under section

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