Month: January 2010

Archive for January, 2010


Anil Kumar Bhatia vs. ACIT (ITAT Delhi)

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DATE: January 25, 2010 (Date of publication)
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S. 153A does not authorize the making of a de novo assessment. While under the 1st Proviso, the AO is empowered to frame assessment for six years, under the 2nd Proviso, only the assessments which are pending on the date of initiation of search abate. The effect is that completed assessments do not abate. There can be two assessments for the same assessment year. Assessments which are not pending on the date of search but are pending before an appellate authority will survive.

Bhavesh Developers vs. AO (Bombay High Court)

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DATE: January 25, 2010 (Date of publication)
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Under the proviso to s. 147, an assessment made u/s 143 (3) can be reopened after the expiry of 4 years from the end of the assessment year only if there is a failure on the part of the assessee to disclose fully and truly all material facts necessary for the assessment. The condition precedent to a valid exercise of the power to reopen the assessment was absent. An exceptional power has been conferred upon the Revenue to reopen an assessment after a lapse of four years and the conditions prescribed by the statute for the exercise of such a power must be strictly fulfilled and in their absence, the exercise of power would not be sustainable in law.

CIT vs. Emptee Poly-Yarn (Supreme Court)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: January 25, 2010 (Date of publication)
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FILE: Click here to view full post with file download link
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Though the Court has repeatedly asked the department to examine the process applicable to the product in question and not to go only by dictionary meanings, the recommendation is not being followed. Even when the assessee gives an opinion on a given process, the Department does not submit any counter opinion. Applying the test laid down in Oracle Software India Ltd, as POY simplicitor is not fit for being used in the manufacture of a fabric and it becomes usable only after it undergoes the operation/process which is called as thermo mechanical process which converts POY into texturised yarn, the said process is “manufacture”.

CIT vs. Oracle Software India (Supreme Court)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: January 25, 2010 (Date of publication)
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FILE: Click here to view full post with file download link
CITATION:

The term “manufacture” implies a change, but, every change is not a manufacture, despite the fact that every change in an article is the result of a treatment of labour and manipulation. However, this test of manufacture needs to be seen in the context of the process adopted by the assessee for duplication of software. If an operation/ process renders a commodity or article fit for use for which it is otherwise not fit, the operation/ process falls within the meaning of the word “manufacture”. Applying this test, as the assessee has undertaken an operation which renders a blank CD fit for use for which it was otherwise not fit, the duplicating process constitutes ‘manufacture’ u/s 80IA(12)(b).

CIT vs. Kelvinator of India (Supreme Court)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: January 19, 2010 (Date of publication)
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FILE: Click here to view full post with file download link
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Though the power to reopen under the amended s. 147 is much wider, one needs to give a schematic interpretation to the words “reason to believe” failing which s. 147 would give arbitrary powers to the AO to re-open assessments on the basis of “mere change of opinion”, which cannot be per se reason to re-open. One must also keep in mind the conceptual difference between power to review and power to re-assess. The AO has no power to review; he has the power to re-assess. But re-assessment has to be based on fulfillment of certain pre-condition and if the concept of “change of opinion” is removed, as contended on behalf of the Department, then, in the garb of re-opening the assessment, review would take place. One must treat the concept of “change of opinion” as an in-built test to check abuse of power by the AO. Hence, after 1.4.1989, the AO has power to re-open, provided there is “tangible material” to come to the conclusion that there is escapement of income from assessment. Reasons must have a live link with the formation of the belief. This is supported by Circular No.549 dated 31.10.1989 which clarified that the words “reason to believe” did not mean a change of opinion.

Geetanjali Trading vs. ITO (ITAT Mumbai)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: January 19, 2010 (Date of publication)
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FILE: Click here to view full post with file download link
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Applying the principle in Govinddas 103 ITR 123 (SC), the amended s. 74 is applicable to computation of loss under the head “Capital Gains” for AY 2003-04 and onwards. As regards loss of earlier years, the law as it then stood gave a vested right of set off the loss against all capital gains. There is nothing in the amendment which withdraws the said vested right. Consequently, the loss can be set off against short-term capital gains despite the amendment.

CIT vs. Gopal Purohit (Bombay High Court)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: January 16, 2010 (Date of publication)
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The Tribunal has correctly applied the principle of law in accepting the position that it is open to an assessee to maintain two separate portfolios, one relating to investment in shares and another relating to business activities involving dealing in shares. Delivery based transactions were rightly treated as being in the nature of investment transactions giving rise to capital gains. The Tribunal correctly accepted the position that though the principle of res judicata is not attracted, there ought to be uniformity in treatment and consistency when the facts and circumstances are identical. The Tribunal has noted that the assessee has followed a consistent practice in regard to the nature of the activities, the manner of keeping records and the presentation of shares as investment at the end of the year in all the years and there is no justification for a different view being taken by the AO.

Shivshahi Punarvasan Prakalp vs. UOI (Bombay High Court)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: January 14, 2010 (Date of publication)
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FILE: Click here to view full post with file download link
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The assessee is a State Govt. undertaking. Its appeal was dismissed by the Tribunal on the ground that the approval of the Committee on Disputes (“COD”) had not been obtained. In a writ petition filed by the assessee, the Additional Solicitor General appearing for the revenue stated that it was not the contention of the revenue that COD approval was required for appeals before the Tribunal in Income-tax matters. It was pointed out that though in ONGC vs. CIDCO 2007 (7) SCC 39, the Supreme Court had directed the formation of a Committee to sort out differences between the Central Government and State Government entities, and a Committee would be constituted by the UOI to look into disputes on a case to case, this was not necessary in income-tax matters. Accordingly, the order of the Tribunal was set-aside for a decision on the merits.

Southern Technologies Ltd vs. JCIT (Supreme Court)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: January 12, 2010 (Date of publication)
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FILE: Click here to view full post with file download link
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The RBI Directions issued u/s 45JA of the RBI Act provide that anticipated losses must be taken into account but expected income need not be taken note of. This is for ensuring that NBFCs state true and correct profits without projecting inflated profits. These are prudential norms or disclosure norms but have nothing to do with the computation or taxability of the provisions for NPA under the IT Act. Further though the RBI Directions deviate from the accounting practice as provided in the Companies Act, they do not override the provisions of the IT Act. The RBI Directions 1998 and the IT Act operate in different fields. The “Provision for NPA” made in terms of the RBI Directions does not constitute expense for purposes of s. 36(1)(vii). The said Provision is for presentation purposes and in that sense it is notional.

Navin Jindal vs. ACIT (Supreme Court)

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DATE: (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: January 12, 2010 (Date of publication)
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FILE: Click here to view full post with file download link
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The right to subscribe for additional offer of shares/debentures on Rights basis, on the strength of existing shareholding in the Company, comes into existence when the Company decides to come out with the Rights Offer. Prior to that, such right, though embedded in the original shareholding, remains inchoate. The same crystallizes only when the Rights Offer is announced by the Company. Therefore, in order to determine the nature of the gains/loss on renunciation of right to subscribe for additional shares/debentures, the crucial date is the date on which such right to subscribe for additional shares/debentures comes into existence and the date of transfer [renunciation] of such right. The said right to subscribe for additional shares/debentures is a distinct, independent and separate right, capable of being transferred independently of the existing shareholding, on the strength of which such Rights are offered.

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