Search Results For: 133A


Concept Communication Ltd vs. DCIT (ITAT Mumbai)

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DATE: November 14, 2018 (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: November 28, 2018 (Date of publication)
AY: 2011-12
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CITATION:
Bogus expenditure: A statement recorded u/s 133A under fear/ coercion cannot be relied upon by the AO if it is not corroborated by documentary evidence. The assessee is entitled to retract such statement. The AO is bound to give the assessee an opportunity to controvert evidence and cross examine the evidence on which the department places its reliance. A failure in providing the same can result in the order being a nullity (All judgements considered)

Retraction being on affidavit was legal and valid and was not belated. Further retraction was supported by explanation of impounded documents to the Survey team. The impounded document did not contain any information which was not recorded in the books of accounts. Hence, in view of retraction and such retraction based on concrete evidence, no addition can be made on the basis of statement taken during survey without bringing on record some corroborative materials

PCIT vs. Texraj Realty P.Ltd (Gujarat High Court)

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DATE: June 12, 2018 (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: June 20, 2018 (Date of publication)
AY: 2011-12
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CITATION:
S. 68: Addition of undisclosed income cannot be made on the basis of (a) entries in dairy found during survey & (b) admission of director in s. 133A survey if assessee has filed a retraction and alleged that the entries/ statement were recorded under pressure. A s. 133A statement is merely information simplicitor and not evidence per se. Addition cannot be sustained if the Dept has not investigated the matter and find material to support the addition

The Tribunal in its detailed order noted that the directors during the course of survey, had retracted the statements by filing affidavits. They also claimed that the diaries were created under the pressure of the survey party. The Tribunal noted decision of the Supreme Court in case of Paul Mathews & Sons v Commissioner Of Income Tax reported in [2003] 263 ITR 101 (Ker) and of Supreme Court in case of The Commissioner Of Income Tax vs M/S.S.Khader Khan Son reported in (2012) 25 taxmann.com 413 (Supreme Court), in which, it was highlighted that the statement under section 133A of the Act was not on oath and would have at best a coroborative value

Amod Shivlal Shah vs. ACIT (ITAT Mumbai)

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DATE: February 23, 2018 (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: April 14, 2018 (Date of publication)
AY: 2006-07
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CITATION:
S. 133A: An admission of estimated income made during survey has no evidentiary value and is not binding on the assessee. The income has to be assessed as per the return of income and books of account. Hiralal Maganlal 97 TTJ Mum 377 distinguished. CBDT Circular No. 286/2/2003 (Inv.) II dated 10.03.2003 referred

The Hon’ble Supreme Court in the case of Pullangode Rubber Produce Co. Ltd. vs State of Kerala & Anr., 91 ITR 18 (SC) recognised the trite law that it was open to the assessee who made the admission to show that it was incorrect. As per the Hon’ble Supreme Court, it was imperative that in such a situation assessee ought to be given a proper opportunity to show the correct state of facts. In fact, in the case before the Hon’ble Supreme Court, assessee was attempting to show that the entries made by it in the account books did not disclose the correct state of facts. The Hon’ble Supreme Court recognised the right of the assessee to do so on the premise that it was open to the assessee who made the admission to show that the same was incorrect. In other words, as per the Hon’ble Supreme Court, the admission made on an anterior date, which was not based on correct state of facts, was not conclusive to hold the issue against the assessee

Kottakkal Wood Complex vs. DCIT (Kerala High Court)

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DATE: July 4, 2016 (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: September 9, 2016 (Date of publication)
AY: 2008-09
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CITATION:
S. 133A: While an assessment cannot be made on the basis of a statement recorded u/s 133A, if the maker of the statement has re-affirmed the statement and nothing has been produced to show that the contents of the statement are incorrect, the assessment is valid

Whatever statement is recorded under Section 133A of the Income-tax Act it is not given any evidentiary value obviously for the reason that the officer is not authorised to administer oath and to take any sworn statement which alone has evidentiary value as contemplated under law. Therefore, there is much force in the argument of learned counsel for the appellant that the statement elicited during the survey operation has not evidentiary value and the Income-tax Officer was well aware of this

ITO vs. Vandana Properties (ITAT Mumbai)

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DATE: December 25, 2014 (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: December 1, 2014 (Date of publication)
AY: 2006-07
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CITATION:
S. 133A: A statement given u/s 133A(iii) is not on oath and can be retracted. Even a statement on oath does not create any estoppel and can be retracted

On the issue whether the statement on oath u/s 133A is binding and cannot be retracted, we have to make a categorical observation, here that statement given u/s 133A is not on oath. Section 133A(iii) observes, “record a statement of

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