Search Results For: cash credit


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DATE: October 11, 2017 (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: November 4, 2017 (Date of publication)
AY: 2010-11
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CITATION:
S. 68: In the absence of any direct evidence demonstrating that the assessee received cash payment, no addition can be made merely on presumption and surmises and on estimate basis. For making the addition on account of cash component, it is the duty of the AO to bring on record corroborative evidence to establish the fact that the entries made in the seized document were correct

The Assessing Officer has not brought on record any clinching evidence on the basis of any enquiry made by him to demonstrate that the assessee has actually received any cash as per the evaluation sheet from Matrix. Therefore, in the absence of any direct evidence demonstrating that the assessee had received cash payment from Matrix, as shown in the evaluation sheet, no addition can be made merely on presumption and surmises and on estimate basis. For making the addition on account of cash component, it was the duty of the Assessing Officer to bring on record corroborative evidence to establish the fact that the entries made in the evaluation sheet were correct

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DATE: August 4, 2017 (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: August 16, 2017 (Date of publication)
AY: 1995-96
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CITATION:
S. 68 "Peak Credits": An accommodation entry provider wanting to avail the benefit of the 'peak credit' has to make a clean breast of all the facts within his knowledge concerning the credit entries in the accounts. He has to explain with sufficient detail the source of all the deposits in his accounts as well as the corresponding destination of all payments from the accounts. The assessee should be able to show that money has been transferred through banking channels from the bank account of creditors to the bank account of the assessee, the identity of the creditors and that the money paid from the accounts of the assessee has returned to the bank accounts of the creditors. The assessee has to discharge the primary onus of disclosure in this regard

The legal position in respect of an accommodation entry provider seeking the benefit of ‘peak credit’ appears to have been totally overlooked by the ITAT in the present case. Indeed, if the Assessee as a self-confessed accommodation entry provider wanted to avail the benefit of the ‘peak credit’, he had to make a clean breast of all the facts within his knowledge concerning the credit entries in the accounts. He has to explain with sufficient detail the source of all the deposits in his accounts as well as the corresponding destination of all payments from the accounts. The Assessee should be able to show that money has been transferred through banking channels from the bank account of creditors to the bank account of the Assessee, the identity of the creditors and that the money paid from the accounts of the Assessee has returned to the bank accounts of the creditors. The Assessee has to discharge the primary onus of disclosure in this regard

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DATE: August 1, 2017 (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: August 12, 2017 (Date of publication)
AY: 2005-06 to 2009-10
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CITATION:
S. 68: Statements recorded u/s 132 (4) do not by themselves constitute incriminating material. A copy of the statement together with the opportunity to cross-examine the deponent has to provided to the assessee. If the statement is retracted and/or if cross-examination is not provided, the statement has to be discarded. The onus of ensuring the presence of the deponent cannot be shifted to the assessees. The onus is on the Revenue to ensure his presence

A copy of the statement of Mr. Tarun Goyal, recorded under Section 132 (4) of the Act, was not provided to the Assessees. Mr. Tarun Goyal was also not offered for the cross-examination. The remand report of the AO before the CIT(A) unmistakably showed that the attempts by the AO, in ensuring the presence of Mr. Tarun Goyal for cross-examination by the Assessees, did not succeed. The onus of ensuring the presence of Mr. Tarun Goyal, whom the Assessees clearly stated that they did not know, could not have been shifted to the Assessees. The onus was on the Revenue to ensure his presence. Apart from the fact that Mr. Tarun Goyal has retracted his statement, the fact that he was not produced for cross-examination is sufficient to discard his statement. Statements recorded under Section 132 (4) of the Act of the Act do not by themselves constitute incriminating material as has been explained by this Court in Commissioner of Income Tax v. Harjeev Aggarwal (supra)

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DATE: March 30, 2016 (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: April 10, 2016 (Date of publication)
AY: 2007-08
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CITATION:
S. 68: Share application money received from an associate concern cannot be assessed as cash credits if assessee has discharged its initial onus to prove the identity, creditworthiness and genuineness of the transaction

CIT(A) dealt with issue all the objections raised by the AO and after considering the documents placed on record, recorded a categorical finding to the effect that amount payable and receivable by the assessee was squared off which was in accordance with the provisions of Companies Act. Further finding was recorded to the effect that these companies were assessed with I.T. Department for several years. The identity and genuineness of the transaction was duly accepted. The detailed finding recorded by CIT(A) are as per material on record

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DATE: March 21, 2016 (Date of pronouncement)
DATE: March 28, 2016 (Date of publication)
AY: 2008-09
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CITATION:
S. 68: Law on when share application moneys and share premium from private companies can be treated as bogus and assessed as cash credits explained

The Assessing Officer had not considered the evidence filed by the assessee during the course of assessment proceedings i.e. affidavits confirming the transaction, PAN number, complete addresses of creditors, copy of balance sheet, ITR for A.Y. 2008-09, bank statement and form No. 18. The assessee had discharged its onus by providing the requisite evidences to prove the identity, genuineness and creditworthiness of the cash creditors. The Assessing Officer herself had accepted the remaining cash creditors to the tune of Rs. 3.95 crores explained on the basis of similar evidences produced by the assessee as genuine. The loan/share capitals were received from the private limited companies. They also are filing return under the company’s law and all information is available on MCA website. The ADIT report was not conclusive to held that the cash creditors were not genuine. It is not required under the law to prove the source of source U/s 68 of the Act. Primary burden lies on the assessee has been discharged by filing the requisite evidences before the Assessing Officer and shifted on the Assessing Officer to disprove the cash creditors’ transactions are not genuine or bogus. The share application money was received by the appellant and subsequently returned though banking channel. In case of 7 companies, the notices were served on it on given addresses. There is no evidence directly or indirectly with the Assessing Officer that the assessee had routed undisclosed money in the guise of share application money or loan