Category: judiciary

The author argues that the Bar must not just complain about faults in the judicial process but must play a proactive role in bringing about reforms. He makes a fervent plea that we should follow the Ten Commandments and promises that we can then restore the Tribunal to its’ past pristine glory.

The author endorses the stand of the Swadeshi Brigade and argues that while Indian lawyers can tackle the stiff competition put up by the foreign lawyers, their sense of values, tradition and ethics will be compromised by the business-like approach of such lawyers.

The author expresses dismay that justice from the Supreme Court is beyond the reach of common citizens of our Country. He makes out a strong case for setting up of four zonal benches of the Supreme Court and also argues that the use of tele-conferencing by the judiciary is imperative to save time and costs.

The author laments that while a heinous crime like terrorism is being fought spiritedly with commandos and bullets, not much is being done about corruption. He warns that corruption is a cancer which is slowly corroding the roots of our …

Fight the twin evils of Society! Read More »

The author warns of a serious conflict of interest in permitting serving Commissioner (Appeals) to argue appeals on behalf of the Department before the ITAT. He argues that no person can be a judge and a lawyer at the same time

The author passionately calls the Tribunal a “Temple of Justice” and the Bench and the Bar its’ “Trustees”. He gives out the clarion call that the onus is on the Bench and the Bar to preserve the Dignity, Sanctity and purity of this Temple

The author makes the radical suggestion that the retirement age of judges may be increased …. but wait …. there’s a catch! …. He wants their right to practice before the lower courts to be taken away! Any takers for this suggestion?

The author lashes out at the tax department for stonewalling the sincere efforts of the Court to reduce the arrears of tax matters by seeking repeated adjournments. He points out the problem areas and also outlines practical suggestions to help the department overcome its perennial drawbacks

The judges want to be exempted from the rigours of the Right to Information Act (“RTI”). And rightly so, because the information that one can dig up on the honourables can be quite embarrassing to them.

The author is severely critical of the Government for the failure of the Settlement Commission to achieve its desired objects. He blames bad administration, lack of transparency in the process of appointment and failure of the Government to appoint Members from the profession as the root causes of the problem. He has identified a few critical areas and makes a fervent plea for reforms.


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